News

Oak Island mystery closer to solution?

Posted by on June 14, 2017

JoySteele-1Oak Island Mystery SolvedAuthor Joy A. Steele was recently interviewed for a popular podcast on the Internet radio station, The ‘X’ Zone Broadcast Network. Like other programs on the network, Kevin Randle’s A Different Perspective (ADP) specializes in “X-file” type subjects. ADP garners about 150,000 listeners. You can link here to the interview with Joy Steele.

The Oak Island mystery is Nova Scotia’s best-known “X-file” – as in “X” marks the spot. While interest in the possibility of buried treasure has attracted treasure hunters for more than 200 years, interest in recent years has been fuelled in part by the TV series The Curse of Oak Island, so far running four seasons on the History Channel.

Well, Joy Steele’s theory, as outlined in her book, The Oak Island Mystery, Solved (CBU Press 2015), seems to be gaining traction – including, we dare say – corroboration late in the TV show’s fourth (2016-2017) season.

To recap – Steele’s book The Oak Island Mystery, Solved theorizes that the real Oak Island treasure is that of its history, and not pirate booty or Aztec gold or the Ark of the Covenant. A recent review of her book tells readers that in his opinion Joy is justified in claiming, as in the title, to have solved the mystery.

Joy’s explanation for the mystery has a lot to do with the 18th-century process of making pitch for the waterproofing of ships. Late in season four, The Curse of Oak Island shows treasure hunters identifying remnants of pitch found in drilling samples from one of their bore holes on the island. We can’t show you the clips, but History Channel subscribers can view season four from the show’s website.

Despite seeing her theory being corroborated for the show’s millions of viewers, Joy’s research continues. She recently came across additional documentation that could further prove her explanation for the various phenomenon that have intrigued (and killed) so many searchers and adventurers.

Col. Kevin Randle (ret.), PhD, says he too has long been interested in Oak Island and its so-called money pit. In the interview, Kevin points out the double-entendre of the money pit: legend has it harbouring buried money or treasure, history has shown that lots of money has been thrown into it by successive attempts to unlock its secret.

In what is to us a ringing endorsement, following the interview, Randle posted (June 8, 2017): “Given the real lack of results in the search for treasure, and that some of the artifacts pulled from the money pit might have been put there to induce investors to spend additional money, what she said made a lot of sense.” Link here to that full post.

Likewise, he points out that Joy’s alternative “solution” is likely being ignored by those with vested interests in the search. In an earlier post, Randle points out: “If there is money to be made on Oak Island, it is in the TV show and in any books that are written about it and not treasure from the Incas or the Aztecs or the Knights Templar or the Spanish pirates or British pirates. As I [Randle] have said, the real treasure is in the TV show and not the ground.” Link here to Col. Randle’s post.

Earlier still, Col. Randle writes in a post titled “Oak Island’s Real Pot of Gold”: “if there is ‘gold’ or ‘treasure’ on Oak Island, it just isn’t buried in the ground. It’s flowing into Nova Scotia to produce the show and probably into the pockets of those who appear on it as ‘cast’ members.”

Randle has, for more than forty-five years, studied UFO phenomena in all its various incarnations. His training by the Army and the Air Force provides Randle with a keen insight into the operations and protocols of the military, their investigations into UFOs, and into a phenomenon that has puzzled people for more than a century.

During his investigations, Col. Randle has travelled the United States to interview hundreds of witnesses who were involved in everything from the Roswell, New Mexico crash of 1947, to the repeated radar sightings of UFOs over Washington, D.C. in 1952, to the latest of the abduction cases.

A Different Perspective is a Commentary on UFOs, Paranormal events, and related topics on The ‘X’ Zone Broadcast Network.

As Joy Steele writes in her introduction to The Oak Island Mystery, Solved, as young person she too was struck with gold fever by the legend of Oak Island. Later in life, however, gold fever turned to cold chills as she slowly discovered the island’s fascinating history and pieced together her theory.

The Oak Island Mystery, Solved, widely available in print and for your e-reader, is approaching best-seller territory as the audience awaits season five of The Curse of Oak Island. Maybe this season, viewers will “witness” the big reveal.

Author Joy A. Steele was recently interviewed for a popular podcast on the Internet radio station, The ‘X’ Zone Broadcast… Continue»

Miners Museum celebrates 50 years

Posted by on June 13, 2017

The Cape Breton Miners Museum, Glace Bay, NS, is fifty years old now, though it is so well established in the minds of Cape Bretoners as to be venerable.

This week (June 11-17, 2017) the museum is celebrating, with lectures, book signings and concerts, including, of course, the world famous The Men of the Deeps, North America’s only coal miners chorus.

On Wednesday (June 14, 2017), two CBU Press authors will take centre stage: Hugh R. MacDonald is the author of Trapper Boy and Us and Them (CBU Press 2012, 2016), and John C. (Jack) O’Donnell is the author of The Men of the Deeps, A Journey With North America’s Only Coal Miners Chorus (CBUP 2016). Hugh and Jack will be at the museum all the evening to sign and discuss their respective books.

Us and ThemTrapper_FC-webThe Men of the DeepsHugh R. MacDonald

 

 

 

We have just learned that Hugh has been invited to read from his new novel Us and Them at Word on the Street, Saturday, September 16, 2017 at the Halifax Central Library. We don’t know the time just yet.

 

The Cape Breton Miners Museum, Glace Bay, NS, is fifty years old now, though it is so well established in… Continue»

Re-release of new edition Italian Lives on “archives day”

Posted by on June 9, 2017

Italian LivesCBU Press recently partnered with the Beaton Institute at Cape Breton University to host a book launch in conjunction with International Archives Day (June 9, 2017).

Long out of print, Italian Lives, Cape Breton Memories, edited by Sam Migliore and A. Evo DiPierro, was first published in 1999. Earlier this year, CBU Press breathed new life into the book, including making it available as an e-book.

A strong and vibrant Italian presence on the island dates back more than 150 years. The book conveys the rich and varied experiences of Italians living in Cape Breton in their own words—the immigration experience; work experience in the home, the steel plant and the coal mines, and life in business, politics and other areas of endeavour.

Many of the chapters in Italian Lives were contributed by members of the local community, many relying on archival materials for their research.

The connection between culture, history, archives and books is vital; They go way back :-)

A great many of our authors – even fiction writers – spend countless hours in archives gleaning insights from the past for their work, including Sam Migliore and Evo DiPierro.

According to the International Council on Archives, “it’s the documentary of human activity retained for its long-term value.”

Catherine Arseneau, director of the Beaton Institute, told the audience said that archives are essential to our understanding of our community. “The records created by individuals and organizations as they go about their lives provide a direct window on past events.”

“We are the custodians of society’s memory,” she added.

The theme for International Archives Day 2017 was “Archives, Citizenship and Interculturalism,” and it was under that banner the Beaton Institute and CBU Press teamed up for the re-launch.

We’ve had some nice comments/reviews about the new edition of Italian Lives, Cape Breton Memories, including the Halifax Chronicle Herald, The Casket and the Cape Breton Post, and Italocanadese.com.

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CBU Press recently partnered with the Beaton Institute at Cape Breton University to host a book launch in conjunction with… Continue»

Liz Doherty inspires

Posted by on May 30, 2017

Doherty9781772060249_FCCongratulations to Liz Doherty, author of The Cape Breton Fiddle Companion (CBU Press 2015), who was recently named Inspirational Teacher of the Year at Ulster University. The award is one of the UU students union’s Learning and Teaching Awards to recognize, celebrate and reward the excellent staff and students “who work tirelessly to make [their] experience at Ulster University outstanding.

In particular, the Inspirational Teacher of the Year Award goes to a person nominated by students who “exemplifies all of the other awards rolled into one. They have that something extra that helps you to understand the most difficult of subjects, but they also take the time to support you outside of class time. Their feedback helps you to develop your learning, and they are organised and enthusiastic in all aspects of their teaching.”

Congratulations Liz, especially for inspiring the next generation of traditional music scholars.

Congratulations to Liz Doherty, author of The Cape Breton Fiddle Companion (CBU Press 2015), who was recently named Inspirational Teacher… Continue»

Best Books and Book Week honours

Posted by on May 19, 2017

DSCN4459The latest issue (Spring 2017) of the Canadian Children’s Book Centre’s Best Books for Kids and Teens arrived this week. As previously highlighted, Hugh R. MacDonald’s Us and Them was selected for inclusion!  In the same batch of mail, the latest issue of Celtic Life International also includes a review of Us and Them. And, we just learned that Hugh will be among the featured guests at a Miners Museum 50th anniversary shindig on June 14.

For some icing on that cake, the 2017 TD Children’s Book Week (May 6-13) special “Read Across Canada!” promotion (A literary journey across Canada) features Hugh’s first novel, Trapper Boy (CBUP 2012).

For forty years, hundreds of Canadian authors, illustrators and storytellers have participated in Book Week, celebrating books and stories with young readers from coast-to-coast-to-coast. This year also marks Canada’s sesquicentennial, so this year’s theme guide also features more than 150 books that pay tribute to the different regions of Canada.

Also on that list of 150 influential books for teens across Canada: The Manager, by Caroline Stellings, and Blood Brothers in Louisbourg, by Philip Roy!

Us and ThemTrapper Boystellings-managerBlood Brothers in Louisbourg

The latest issue (Spring 2017) of the Canadian Children’s Book Centre’s Best Books for Kids and Teens arrived this week…. Continue»

Another literary step in the right direction

Posted by on May 11, 2017

Battiste-et-al-e-humanities-announce

Book launch – Visioning a Mi’kmaw Humanities

Posted by on May 5, 2017

In partnership with Unama’ki College (Cape Breton University) we are pleased to announce the official launch of Visioning a Mi’kmaw Humanities: Indigenizing the Academy, edited by Marie Battiste.

Mi'kmaw HumanitiesA native of Potlotek and professor at the University of Saskatchewan, Dr. Battiste, led a team of scholars and researchers to bring new perspectives and new sensibilities to how Mi’kmaq and other Indigenous peoples have come to know and appreciate the deep spiritual treasure they have in them.

What is understood as the humanities celebrates the educational and humane disciplines of philosophy, history, theology, languages and literatures. Undeniably Eurocentric, the humanities are embedded in disciplinary knowledge that ignores core capacities of all societies and cultures.

Battiste-MarieAs Dr. Battiste writes, the current vision of humanities education is a kind of “cognitive imperialism” that is its own authority to define what is considered normal and desirable.

“All other ways of thinking, learning and understanding the world are viewed as deficient,” she writes, “it’s the cognitive equivalent of racism.”

In Visioning a Mi’kmaw Humanities, eleven educators contribute their perspectives and research demonstrating how generations of Indigenous peoples have endured the Eurocentric education forced on them, not just in residential schools, but also in provincial public and federal schools and in postsecondary institutions.

Eurocentric approaches have cost indigenous peoples plenty: erosion and even loss of many of the indigenous languages; loss of spiritual identities and traditions linked to their ways of knowing; disconnections from Elders, lands, livelihood; and spiritual communicative connections to the land and much more.

The authors urge an agenda of restoration—a vision of society and of education where knowledge systems and languages are reinforced, not diluted, where they can respectfully gather together without resembling each other, and where peoples can participate in the cultural life of a society, education and their community with dignity.

Visioning a Mi’kmaw Humanities is already in bookstores and on-line stores, including as an e-book. The official launch is scheduled for Tuesday, May 16, 2-4 p.m., in the Unama’ki College department (L-151) at Cape Breton University. Everyone is welcome.

 

 

In partnership with Unama’ki College (Cape Breton University) we are pleased to announce the official launch of Visioning a Mi’kmaw Humanities: Indigenizing… Continue»

Fr. Greg MacLeod (1935-2017)

Posted by on May 4, 2017

Greg-MacLeod-Ideas-Man-1We are saddened to learn of the death of Fr. Greg MacLeod (May 3, 2017). Fr. Greg was one of the last of a class of professor priests, whose footsteps walked the talk of social justice and a social economy.

Fr. Greg was instrumental in the development of what is now Cape Breton University and one of its most cherished programs: community development. His influence on the university and on Cape Breton will be felt for generations.

The May 4, 2017 edition of CBC Cape Breton’s Information Morning replayed an interview with MacLeod, which was one of a series of interviews of Cape Breton Leaders who “get things done” back in 2009. Link here to listen to that item.

Those interviews were turned into a book, by host Steve Sutherland, titled Getting it Done: Conversations with Cape Breton Leaders (CBU Press 2009). We’ve posted the chapter on Fr. Greg MacLeod -link here.leadership-195x300

 

 

 

We are saddened to learn of the death of Fr. Greg MacLeod (May 3, 2017). Fr. Greg was one of… Continue»

Living Treaties collection “stands alone”

Posted by on May 2, 2017

9781772060539_FC“Each chapter in its way speaks to the continuing relevance of the treaties and the great need for continued work toward realizing the promise of these peace and friendship agreements,” reads a review in the Journal of Folklore Research review of Living Treaties: Narrating Mi’kmaw Treaty Relations, edited by Marie Battiste.

“Toward the stated end of educating Mi’kmaw, Canadian, and UK readers about the ongoing importance of treaty relations, the book is written in a lively and accessible narrative style. Even the more technical legal sections are relatively free of specialized jargon. Many readers will appreciate that most chapters begin with a personal introduction from the author. Much of the writing manages to convey complex and exigent arguments while avoiding the sometimes obtuse stylistic conventions of the scholarly article.

“This collection stands alone among literature exploring the political life of Canada’s Atlantic provinces. Living Treaties is an invaluable resource for those interested in the Mi’kmaw nation, yet it is also applicable for other First Nations community members, lawyers, scholars, activists, and allies, as well as anyone interested in Canadian history and politics.”

Link here to the comprehensive review

 

 

“Each chapter in its way speaks to the continuing relevance of the treaties and the great need for continued work… Continue»

Company Houses, Company Towns “seminal” : Review

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Company Houses, Company TownsWe are getting caught up on some recent reviews. Acadiensis, Journal of the History of the Atlantic Region’s April 28 blog features a review of Company Houses, Company Towns: Heritage and Conservation, edited by Andrew Molloy and Tom Urbaniak (CBU Press 2016).

Company Houses, Company Towns is a “fascinating collection,” writes Andrew Parnaby. It “highlights the importance of viewing heritage and conservation as a form of social entrepreneurship.  When this type of community engagement is oriented by an appreciation of the aesthetic value of vernacular places, dedicated to breaking down barriers between issues and institutions, and buoyed by the hope that marginal places may live to see another day, the possibilities for political change multiply. In other words, in the view of the contributors to this volume, the direction of change for working-class communities in post-industrial settings need not always be down and out.”

You can link here to the full review

The April 2017 issue Midwest Book Review’s online book review magazine “Reviewer’s Bookwatch” also features a review of Company Houses, Company Towns, stating that the “seven seminal articles [are] very highly recommended for both community and academic library collections…. [I]t should be noted for the personal reading lists of students and non-specialist general readers with an interest in the subject.”

You can link here to the full review

 

 

We are getting caught up on some recent reviews. Acadiensis, Journal of the History of the Atlantic Region’s April 28… Continue»